Communion Of Dreams


Scary. Just plain scary.

Behold this year’s Habanero experiment:

The Compote of DEATH.

The Compote of DEATH.

What you’re looking at is pureed super-hot Habaneros. With just enough vinegar and salt to preserve them for canning.

OK, the full story …

This morning I made a batch of my Habanero Sriracha sauce. One of my standards. But I decided to do it a little bit differently this year. Rather than use a limited amount of Habaneros in it, and just blend them in, I added a full two gallons of frozen habs to the vinegar & tomato sauce mixture and cooked them until soft. Then I removed all the peppers, setting them aside to cool. There’s still plenty of heat and flavor from the habs in the Sriracha (recipe below).

But then I added some more salt and a little apple cider vinegar to the cooked Habaneros, and ran the whole lot through a food processor. And that’s in the pic above.

The idea behind this isn’t that you’d actually use this stuff directly on food, like you would a hot sauce or some of my Habanero Dust from a spice grinder. Rather, it’s intended to be used in very small amounts as the basis for some larger dish or sauce, giving you just concentrated (almost pure) Habanero flavor and heat. I’ll put it into 4 ounce jars for a very limited number of insane friends.

Just thought I’d share the idea.

Jim Downey

This year’s Sriracha recipe (variation on the theme of recipes you’ll find elsewhere):

  • 5 quarts homemade tomato sauce
  • 2 cups apple cider vinegar
  • 2 cups dark honey
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 3 heads of garlic crushed
  • .25 cup of Kosher salt
  • 3 Tablespoons of Fish Sauce
  • Habaneros (mix of super-hot varietals)

Add all ingredients into large pot. Heat to simmer, stirring often. Remove Habaneros. Simmer rest for half an hour or so, then allow to cool.

EDIT NOTE: After trying the Sriracha prior to canning, I decided that it was just plain too hot, so added another couple of quarts of tomato sauce and changed the total above. Everything else still seemed pretty much in balance after. I think the heat level was masking some other problems earlier.

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It’s a gas, gas, gas!*

It’s Habanero season again!

I noted a few weeks back that I had harvested the first of this year’s crop, and that I thought that things looked promising, if the weather held. Well, all together I harvested about 200 fully-ripe peppers, seeding freezing them in small batches, and I’ll make some of my Habanero Sriracha with that later. But last Friday we had the first hard freeze of the season, so I picked all the rest of the remaining fruit off the plants. Here’s a the pic of that:

20141031_094300

Now, since turning whole peppers into hot sauce is the sort of thing which can drive any sane person out of the house, I waited until today to do this year’s production. Why? Because my wife is a poll worker, and so is gone all day. Well, here’s that exact same box of peppers, which had just been closed up since Friday:

20141104_122814

Fun, eh? Welcome to ethylene gas. Yup, the peppers are a LOT more ripe, just from being shut up for a few days. Not as ripe as last year’s end-of-season harvest, but not bad at all. And since my version of Sriracha is fairly sweet, I decided to make a less sweet batch of sauce out of the above, since it will tend to accentuate the citric qualities of the not-entirely-ripe peppers. So, here’s this year’s recipe:

  • Approximately 335 peppers, crown removed and cut in half
  • Not quite a gallon of natural apple cider vinegar
  • 8 tablespoons of Kosher salt
  • 3 heads of garlic
  • 2 large yellow onions, rough chopped

Prepare all ingredients. Saute onions and garlic until soft. Add vinegar, salt and peppers to 5 gallon stock pot, simmer until soft, stirring often.

Scoop into blender, do a rough blend for 15 – 20 seconds. Then pour into Foley food mill, and crank until just seeds and skins are left.  Transfer to jar, can.

 

Edited to add later:  Total of 22.5 half pints. Which works out to about 2 habaneroes per fluid ounce, which is what my standard ‘Evil Green’ (previously my hottest sauce) runs, except that this has a much higher % of fully or mostly ripe habs.And this is clearly hotter than anything else I’ve ever made. Pic below – need a good name for it. It’s the one on the right, the reddish one is my Sriracha (about the color of tomato sauce) for comparison.

20141104_171747

Jim Downey

*With apologies.



I wonder if I need to notify the authorities …

As I’ve mentioned previously, it was a good year for peppers. Well, in addition to making the big batch of sauce at the end of the season, I also dried approximately 5 gallons of seeded habaneros of various sorts. And this morning I got around to crushing them. Here’s the result:

Quart jars of powdered evil.

Quart jars of powdered evil.

That works out to something like 8 ounces (fluid volume) of crushed habs per gallon of fresh/frozen. Yeah, baby!

 

Jim Downey



Oh. Yeah.

Remember this?

Hab harvest, 2013

Hab harvest, 2013

 

Well, this morning I got started turning those into this:

Simmer, simmer

Simmer, simmer

 

Which resulted in this, after other ingredients were added and it was allowed to simmer for a while:

Mmm.

Mmm.

 

Which was then run through a blender for a bit, then cranked through a Foley food mill to remove seeds and skins, resulting in this:

Oh. Yeah.

Oh. Yeah.

 

Which became 30 half-pint jars of just incredible sauce. So, there’s about two full habs per ounce of this stuff. I just had about 1/8th a teaspoon on a burger, and my oh my.

I think I’ll call it Scorpion Blood, since it includes (among other varietals) two different ‘Scorpion’ peppers: the Moruga Scorpion, and the Trinidad Scorpion.

Mmmm.

 

Jim Downey

Recipe, for those interested:

  • Approximately 500 peppers, crown removed and cut in half
  • Half a gallon of natural apple cider vinegar
  • 2 cups white sugar
  • 8 tablespoons of Kosher salt
  • Quart of homemade tomato sauce
  • 20 ounce of chopped garlic
  • 2 yellow onions, rough chopped

Prepare all ingredients. Put peppers, onion and vinegar in 5 gallon stock pot, simmer until peppers & onion all soft.  Add other ingredients, simmer about an hour, stirring often.

Scoop into blender, do a rough blend for 15 – 20 seconds. Then pour into Foley food mill, and crank until just seeds and skins are left.  Transfer to jar, can.